LUCERNA HAS A NEW HOME

If you use Lucerna regularly, please update any links or bookmarks to go to our new location: lucerna.exeter.ac.uk

This existing version of Lucerna (www.slides.uni-trier.de) will still be available for a while, but has not been updated since June 2019

Search

Contact us

 

Slide sets

Slides

People

Organisations

Events

Locations

Hardware

Texts

Keywords

Collections

Fossils: what they are and what they teach us (lantern lecture, Exeter, Devon, England, 30 November 1907)

Type of event
lantern lecture
Full title
Fossils: what they are and what they teach us
Date
30 November 1907
Continuity
event in series
Price of admission
free of charge
Time of day
20:00
People linked to event

COLLINS, Frederick G., F.G.S.  (1866-1933) – lecturer

ROWLEY, F.R.  (1869-1939) – lantern operator

Organisations linked to event
References

“The Art Gallery at the Royal Albert Memorial Museum at Exeter was filled on Saturday night, when one of the series of free evening lectures was delivered by Mr F.G. Collins, F.G.S., the subject being 'Fossils: What they are and what they teach us.' [summary of lecture content follows].

Some exceptionally beautiful views of the Cathedral, which were introduced for the purpose of illustrating the stonework, were lent by Miss Clarke. The lantern was worked by Mr Rowley, the curator, who next week will deal with 'Microscopic life in ponds and rock pools.'”

Express and Echo (7 December 1907)

“Business responsibilities have prevented me from attending the fortnightly Museum lectures, but I managed to hear Mr F.R.[sic] Collins, F.R.G.S.[sic], on Saturday night, tell us all about fossils. Let me say at once that it was most entertaining from start to finish, and that Mr Collins has an excellent style and enunciation. It was Sir Robert Ball, I think, who made scientific lectures popular by introducing some of his Hibernian humour. Mr Collins was also full of anecdote, several of his stories being of Sir Richard Owen, the eminent zoologist. [...]

Mr Colllins' pictures were especially interesting. One of them was unique -- it was a photograph of the roof of Exeter Cathedral, showing the unbroken line of 400 feet. This was taken by Miss Clarke whilst the scaffolding for the new West Window was in position -- an opportunity, of course, that will not recur in our generation, unless something very special should happen. And what point do you think the lecturer was enforcing? That the Purbeck marble of which those beautiful pillars are composed is nothing but a fossilised deposit of snails, and he described the conditions under which it was laid. [...]”

Lucerna ID 7006362

Record created by Richard Crangle. Last updated 31 May 2017

How to cite this record: all the information in Lucerna is freely available for use for any legal non-commercial purpose. If you use any of the information or images on this page, please credit Lucerna in the following (or an equivalent) style:

  Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource, www.slides.uni.trier.de/event/index.php?id=7006362. Accessed 9 August 2020.

All Lucerna data is published in good faith as the latest known version of the information, but without any guarantee as to its accuracy or completeness. If you can correct or add to our information, or supply any images, please Contact us.